Category Archives: News

Kealoha O‘hana Reunion on May 11

Time to round up all the old folks as well as the young adults, children and everyone else on my Mom’s side of the family for an upcoming reunion that is coming quicker than I would like to think.

It will be a good time to catch up with everyone and anyone who comes, take another round of new photos and hopefully pass the baton on to the next generation of Kealohas and related relatives as this o’hana moves further into the 21st century and beyond.

This reunion will be a one day affair to talk story, exchange ideas for keeping and staying in touch with each other, share genealogical information and get to know each other better…. especially the older folks getting to know who all the young ones are.

Years ago when we had a few reunions, I shot a ton of pictures at these, many of them children with their parents and grandparents, uncles and aunties, etc. Now the children are all grown up, many with their own children… and grandchildren… maybe.

So it is a good time for me, at least to pass on the legacy photo duties and digital copies to someone else. If anything, this should be interesting and fun.

Aloha. Mel


Some Interesting Links

 

Best Wishes to Mick Jagger

Mick Jagger in 1976

Mick Jagger in concert with The Rolling Stones in 1976.

Best wishes go out to singer Mick Jagger of The Rolling Stones who a heart valve replacement procedure this past week. According to this article from Billboard Magazine:

Mick Jagger has completed his heart valve procedure in New York and is recovering and in great health, sources tells Billboard.

Doctors were able to access Jagger’s heart valve through his femoral artery and are now monitoring the Rolling Stones frontman for any complications that could arise from the procedure, including excess bleeding. On Sunday (March 31) the Stones announced they were rescheduling their North American No Filter Tour so that Jagger could have the procedure.

While the recovery time for the procedure is much shorter than surgery, Jagger must rest for four to five days so that the artery can heal without any severe bleeding issues. He could be up an moving in a few days, but will need some additional recovery time before returning to the stage.

I’ve long been a fan of The Rolling Stones since I first heard their hit “(Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” back in the 1960s. I bought many of their records and saw them in concert at Aloha Stadium in 1998.

I am sure Jagger had earlier health issues with drugs and alcohol that are typical to many rock stars. In later years it was reported that he straightened himself out. He certainly has  never gained much weight in all those years and has toured extensively throughout the world with a high energy show that he is well known for.

It is cool that Mick Jagger’s procedure did not require open heart surgery. That probably means at age 75 he is in better health than I was at age 58+ only a few years ago.

My Twitter post

From Twitter….

 

Hawaii’s Glimpse at the Great American Solar Eclipse

Starting with this post, Bypass Avenue will expand to cover some of my personal commentaries about non-health related items such as the solar eclipse which occurred yesterday. This post also appears at my Hawaii Files Blog site.

Today's Solar Eclipse

By Melvin Ah Ching, Editor & Publisher, The Hawaii Files Blog

As solar eclipses go, yesterday’s partial one in Honolulu was adequately good. The Great American Solar Eclipse of 2017 was a huge phenomena and event throughout the continental United States as the path of totality traveled eastward in a narrow 70 mile wide band from the Oregon coast to the tip of South Carolina. Much of the continent had a good partial eclipse that covered most of the sun.

In a solar eclipse, the moon’s shadow blots out the sunlight as it passes between the sun and the Earth. During totality that shadow blocks out nearly all sunlight except for a narrow band around the perimeter that creates a remarkable and unforgettable view. Solar eclipses are rare occurrences that track within small and varied regions of Earth’s surface. Within the eclipse’s band, many areas get a partial eclipse while totality only occurs within a smaller zone.

Millions of people on the U.S. continent witnessed and captured images of the eclipse going into and out of totality including the 2 minute long phase of full shadowed coverage.

In Honolulu, my friend Lisa Davidson and I awoke early and trekked to the Waialae Kahala Beach Park an hour before sunrise to secure a good viewing spot that I scoped out the day before. Anticipating the eclipse, which started near Hawaii, Lisa and I both photographed the changing light around us as night receded into the new day. The rising sun was going to be in the eclipse process. I had to be prepared for that.

I had three cameras with me including my Canon 600D SLR with a 300mm lens set up on a tripod, Fujifilm HS10 EVF with a wide to long built in zoom lens, and a Samsung smart phone that can also do pictures. Lisa had her trusty little Samsung that she used to catch the “feel” of the moments. We both had protective eclipse viewers that I got last year from Bishop Museum. I used the 58mm screw on sun filter for the cameras to get eclipse images.

We were set. We waited. Talked. Photographed. The sunrise was pretty, but the clouds were getting in the way. I was wondering if the clouds would pre-empt my eclipse view.

Eclipse times for Hawaii from timeanddate.com.

Sunrise in Honolulu was at 6:11 am. Moonrise was 2 minutes earlier at 6:09am. The eclipse began at 5:50am before the sun rose. Everything was in motion for a good eclipse except for the clouds.

It was not until 7:16 am that I caught my first fleeting glimpse of the sun poking through the clouds. I fired the Canon for a continuous burst of images as the clouds slowly broke and the sun revealed its new face for a few moments. And then the clouds rolled back in.

I got a few images but I wanted more. My wish came true as the clouds slowly blew away and the eclipsed sun appeared again as I fired more frames off with the camera. I got my 20% or probably a little less than that. It was better than nothing and certainly better than the 10% that I got during last year’s eclipse from Magic Island.

I snapped more photos in the next 15 minutes of the waning spectacle.

Lisa was thrilled as she was able to see the eclipse through my camera’s LCD screen and the protective filters that allowed us to view the show with our own eyes. She was very thankful that I shared these moments with her.

By 7:30 in the morning the eclipse was over. The sun was out, the day was bright and life would continue as it always does.

It turns out that this year’s solar eclipse is the last one to be visible in Hawaii until April 8, 2024, when another total eclipse will be viewable in the continental United States. The next total solar eclipse occurs in the southeastern Pacific Ocean and over the South American countries of Chile and Argentina on July 2, 2019.


Photos by Mel unless indicated.

Today's Solare EclipseThis is one of the best shots I got of yesterday’s solar eclipse. Investing in a screw on solar lens filter is worth the money!

Sunlit Clouds Over Koko HeadThe beautiful but sunlight blocking clouds over Koko Head.

What To Watch
Catching a live video stream while waiting for clouds to depart.

Monday Morning SunriseThe beautiful Hawaiian sunrise and clouds blocked the sun for nearly 40 minutes after the eclipse began.

Streaming From OregonWatching a live stream from Oregon as we waited out the clouds.

Today's Solar EclipseYou can get a decent shot out of your cell phone camera if you put one of those protective eye safety filters in front of your camera lens. Lisa did that and it got her this picture with the tiny sun chopped slightly to the bottom left.

Eclipse 2017 - 1Solar eclipse view from Ontario, Canada. Keith Watson Photography.

2017 Aug. 21 ~ The Diamond Ring - total solar eclipseTotality, August 21, 2017 – Kansas, United States. Michael Watson, photographer.

2017 Total Solar Eclipse - ISS TransitInternational Space Station in transit ahead of the moon. NASA. You can also see sunspots in this excellent photo.


KHON TV’s McKenna Maduli reports on the eclipse from Waialae Kahala Beach park not too far away from where we were. There are 3 clips embedded in this video composite.

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